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I'm brand new to the forum, so if I should be posting elsewhere on this site, please overlook it. I learned today that my 2010 Enclave that just tolled over 100,000 miles has a "stretched" timing chain requiring a $2,700 repair at the local Buick dealer. In another post, a member said the 2010 Enclaves had a 120,000 mile warranty on the timing chain. Can someone verify this? Also, it seems that earlier models had a timing chain problem but was thought to be corrected by 2010. I'm wondering if I may have an early 2010 with a 2009 engine. Is this a possibility? Has anyone else had a timing chain problem with a 2010?
 

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Open your driver's door and look for a sticker that will have the month and year your car was manufactured. This will give you a very good idea if yours was an early build 2010. I don't believe the 2010 models were included in the extended warranty for timing chains. You will have to double check with a dealer to make sure. Here is a copy of the letter sent to owner's of certain year vehicles. Like I said, I don't know if other year models were added.

http://www-odi.nhtsa.dot.gov/acms/cs/jaxrs/download/doc/UCM422873/CSC-10043857-8394.pdf
 

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I believe the 2010 ARE NOT part of the extended timing chain warranty.

Ive seen a few recent post about 2010's with timing chain problems.
Very few.

I dont know where this info on 2010's with leftover 2009's comes from.... I have no idea if its true.

Im an early build..
My Traverse was the 56th unit built for 2010. Which is pretty much the 1st day of production.
Mine was built in Spring Hill.

I have seen no evidence of my 2010 shedding iron as Ive done many Used oil analysis- and use regular oil.

Now-- Are the Spring hill units Immune-- I dont think so.

Theres a Traverse member- whose 2010 Traverse was the 1,1xx unit built- and he just had his chains replaced.

But this was - for the most part 'corrected' for 2010's...

the 08-09 were failing pretty early (low miles).

The 2010's seem to be holding up till much later.

But like I said- I just had a UOA at 92,000- and the iron was super low.



Also--- the 2009's used Bosch COILS.

the 2010s use DENSO coils.

The 09's coils fail in high numbers..
the Densos- so far seem very good.


Maybe you can take a look at your coils-- and see if it says Bosch or Denso.////// just an idea.
 

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I have found no evidence that the 2010s are involved in the extended timing chain coverage, either.
 

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rbarrios. I knew you had one of the first 2010 models built.

Can you tell us what your door sticker says for month and year?

Might help the OP with seeing where his model was built time wise, early or late.

I wouldn't doubt that "leftover" 2009 engines (or other parts) are put into early 2010 models unless there was a change in design, horsepower, etc. Remember, your early 2010 still had the overhead Homelink lighted buttons. GM used up their supply of that item, and then quit installing them on later build 2010's.

I'm sure the same is done with engines, transmission. etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Since the car is in the shop I can't check the door, but he service tech says there is nothing from GM that indicates that the timing chain warranty has been extended, as it has been for power steering pumps and water pumps. He did say that while the engine was out, they replaced th water pump at no charge to me.
Thanks for your input!
 

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JimW said:
Since the car is in the shop I can't check the door, but he service tech says there is nothing from GM that indicates that the timing chain warranty has been extended, as it has been for power steering pumps and water pumps. He did say that while the engine was out, they replaced th water pump at no charge to me.
Thanks for your input!
Hi Jim,

It is so great to hear that you are working with your dealership regarding this timing chain concern, but I am sorry to hear that you are experiencing this situation with your Enclave. I am more than happy to look further into this if you would like. Please provide me with the name of your involved dealership, VIN, mileage, full name, and phone number if this is of interest. I hope to hear from you soon and enjoy your evening.

All the best,


Buick Customer Care
 

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ls973800 said:
rbarrios. I knew you had one of the first 2010 models built.

Can you tell us what your door sticker says for month and year?

Might help the OP with seeing where his model was built time wise, early or late.
decal shows 7/09
 

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I purchased my 2010 around Sept/Oct 09 as well and I am dealing with the same problem right now, I honestly believe if we aren't included in the extended warranty we should be.... :-\ :angryfire: :help:
 

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2010 Buick Enclave Timing Chain out at under 100,000 miles

My 2010 Buick Enclave, driven less than 10,000 miles per year and oil changed at regular intervals, had the dreaded P00008 trouble code and required the timing change replaced. The repair was about $2,000. I asked the dealer to check on any warranties and work with the GM rep. They told me there was not a warranty on the 2010 model and it should not have gone out this soon. When is GM going to admit that the 2010's are having the problem too? Expect to see more with this problem now that they are approaching 10 years old.

All-in-all I've not been impressed with this vehicle. I like the size for a family vehicle but it's had too many little defects (and no indicator for headlights on). My dealer experiences have been varied. The dealer broke my passenger power seat fixing a simple seat belt recall item. The tire pressure monitoring system isn't reset after they moved tires around. The dealer didn't tighten the wheel lock lugs after the recent service and luckily two of them fell off in my driveway (so I was able to find them and put them back on).
 

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Among the Traverse/Acadia/Enclave forum....


2010/2011/2012 vehicles that had the timing chain issue 'early' on... owners did not make it a habit of checking oil levels often.
the 3.6 uses oil... and oil levels are very important in the way these engines work. VVT.
 

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A modern engine that uses oil? Is this due to the DI system, or just engine design? Is the LY7 engine in 2008 Enclaves also known to eat oil?
 

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A modern engine that uses oil? Is this due to the DI system, or just engine design? Is the LY7 engine in 2008 Enclaves also known to eat oil?
Yes. My 08 consumes a quart over 3,500 miles, when I do my oil changes.
 

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A modern engine that uses oil? Is this due to the DI system, or just engine design? Is the LY7 engine in 2008 Enclaves also known to eat oil?

This is also an issue on other car makers DI engines.
Not just GM.


But its almost guaranteed that as your miles rack up--- you will start to use oil.
Something that Ive read recently points to the Carbon buildup as the culprit.

It builds up and breaks off- or it sticks to the piston rings.

In the cylinder- where the super hard carbon- scratches the cylinder walls- Zebra Stripping---
these little scratches allow oil to seep past the ring and be burned- and some fuel to make it into the oil.
Thus- you get oil burning.
 

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this was posted the other day on the Traverse forum.




interesting and makes sense.,


My 2 cents,,,,
GDI engines get a lot of carbon build up on intake valves.
When carbon falls off the intake valve because the carbon build up on the intake valve is so great
Or
When carbon falls off intake Valve because you using a "running engine intake valve cleaner", like CRC intake valve cleaner,
then
the chunks of carbon that fall off your intake valve,
like small grains of sand,
could fall into your engines cylinders, and get lodged between the piston ring and cylinder wall.
This carbon lodged between piston ring and cylinder wall might scratch your cylinder walls, making "zebra stripes" and creating potential leak paths for future engine oil consumption issues,
And
This this carbon lodged between piston rings and cylinder walls might Cause misfires, via the process known as LSPI.......
Who knows?? That^^ is my 2 cents^^

"Low speed pre-ignition (LSPI)
is a premature combustion event, occurring prior to spark ignition
it occurs when engines operate at low speeds and high loads. It can result in extremely high cylinder-pressures and can lead to heavy knock."

An article in "engine builder" says ....
The article titled "Solving Gasoline Direct Injection Issues: The facts and fictions of GDI"
Says...

“You want small droplets of fuel to intertwine with air,” he says.
“What happens with the direct injection engine is you’re squirting that liquid fuel into the cylinder, it gets on the cylinder walls and absorbs into the oil.
What happens during the combustion event is the oil that is on the cylinder walls contains gasoline
so it ignites and it burns off. That’s why a lot of direct injection engines are experiencing significant oil consumption and flash burns in the cylinder.”

An issue known as Low Speed Pre-Ignition (LSPI) typically occurs in vehicles with GDI engines.
Detonation typically occurs in two areas
– in and around the vicinity of the sparkplug,
or
at the perimeter of the cylinder in the crevice clearance above the top ring between the cylinder and the crown of the piston.

“What I found to be the problem is that fuel injection, especially direct injection, has a very poor accelerator pump function where as a carburetor has an accelerator pump or two,” Dickmeyer says.
“So when you are at a high load, low speed operation of the engine and depress the throttle slowly it squirts additional fuel through the accelerator pumps. Fuel injection doesn’t really have that function as well.
What happens under this low speed, high load situation is
you get bits of carbon and soot that break off from the valves
and in the combustion chamber
which makes its way to the cylinder walls where it sticks to the oil and the fuel that’s on the cylinder walls.
When the piston moves up it loads the crevice clearance with carbon,
and those little groupings of carbon and soot get diluted with fuel and oil
which then smolder and act like a glow plug or a wick to cause pre-ignition.”
 
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