EnclaveForum.net: Buick Enclave Online Community banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Need some more help. ;D
I've bought an auxilary tranny cooler that I want to install. I have the trailer towing package but more cooling for the tranny can't hurt. Can anyone tell me which line is "in" or "out" from the rad for the transmission cooler?? I want to connect the "out" from the rad to the "in" on the aux. tranny cooler and then the "out " from the Aux. tranny cooler to the "in" of the transmission. Again thanks in advance. :help:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
349 Posts
Don't know which is which but you can disconnect one, start the engine for 5 seconds and see if it is pumping. It is low volume so it won't spray everywhere.

Also, be careful with the extra cooler. You can cool the tranny fluid too much if you have too much cooler. If the trans fluid runs too cool, it won't burn off contaminates and it will degrade quickly. Kind of like oil in an engine that drives only very short trips. Always considered way severe driving.

Having said all that, without a trans temp gauge, you really don't know if you are over cooling, under cooling, or just right as Goldilocks would say ;D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
I wouldn't recommend the extra cooler............just change the fluid to a high quality synthetic and you will be good to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,999 Posts
Ditto with above concerns! Unless you live/tow thru our desert states .......in summer......or severe mountain climbs, I wouldn't add an additional cooler either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
360 Posts
I agree. In this case I don't think "more is better". I would maybe talk to a tranny specialist and see if the tranny cooler that is included with the tow pkg is good or not before I would start adding in additional hardware (IMHO).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,693 Posts
It depends on what type of auxiliary tranny cooler you buy. I've got a Long Manufacturing Tru-Cool unit on the Avalanche; it is a low pressure drop unit and has a bypass valve that doesn't let the transmission fluid circulate through it until it's up to temperature. You only get additional cooling when it's needed. The B&M Supercooler units work the same way. I need the extra cooling capacity with the relatively weak 4L60E transmission that's behind the 6K pound supercharged brick. Not to mention my next mod is a 2600 stall torque converter that will generate more heat.

Unless you are towing maximum loads on a regular basis I doubt an additional cooler is necessary on the Enclave. Just change the fluid and filter on a regular basis and you should be fine. Rick418cars recommended synthetic fluid but a lot of knowledgable performance transmission rebuilders do not recommend synthetic; I would recommend you do some due diligence research before going this route. The new Dexron is a semi-synthetic fluid and that's what I'll be using. If you do decide on a cooler I would recommend either of the units above.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
My close personal friend is working on a project for the military using GM transmissions and has done extensive
research testing trans. fluids and with out a doubt the synthetic is far superior to breaking down due to heat.
Performance transmissions are a different application altogether not meant to go 200,000 miles. Maybe the semi-synthetic is a great way to go. I do like the idea of an aux. cooler that only opens when needed.....sounds like the answer to me.
Cheers,
RICK
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,693 Posts
I agree that synthetic tranny fluid is far superior to non-synthetic fluid in heat breakdown resistance just like synthetic oil is far superior to traditional oil. I also know several people who have used synthetic tranny fluid for extended periods of time in different vehicles that swear by it.

The best performance tranny builder I know of for the 4L60E tranny, Finish Line Transmission, does not recommend synthetic. I've got to respect his experience and knowledge on this matter.

I just checked the owner's manual and we have Dexron VI in the Enclave; it's already the semi-synthetic fluid from the factory. The service interval indicates to change the fluid at 50K miles for severe service, which most of us qualify for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
349 Posts
BadAV said:
I agree that synthetic tranny fluid is far superior to non-synthetic fluid in heat breakdown resistance just like synthetic oil is far superior to traditional oil. I also know several people who have used synthetic tranny fluid for extended periods of time in different vehicles that swear by it.

The best performance tranny builder I know of for the 4L60E tranny, Finish Line Transmission, does not recommend synthetic. I've got to respect his experience and knowledge on this matter.

I just checked the owner's manual and we have Dexron VI in the Enclave; it's already the semi-synthetic fluid from the factory. The service interval indicates to change the fluid at 50K miles for severe service, which most of us qualify for.
I'm with BadAV on the trans. I had FLT rebuild my Tahoe Trans and they would not warranty the trans if I ran synthetic. Their shop is about 200 yards down the street from my office and they know WAAAAY more about transmissions than I do. Their suggestion was taken seriously and I only ran dino fluid..

Since Dex VI is semi-synthetic, you probably get the best of both worlds. I'll be changing it at 50K with Dexron VI in my wifes Enclave.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
I've never had problems with synthetic transmission fluid in any car I've owned. I use AMSOIL transmission fluid in everything and I swear by it. Since the DEXRON VI is partly synthetic, it seems that GM likes it too somewhat.

I still have a 1997 Explorer with 250,000 miles on synthetic fluid. First Mobil 1 synthetic, and then AMSOIL. NO ill effects, but I have heard of other Explorer owners changing transmissions because of overheated regular MERCON fluid.

My 3rd car is a 99 Lexus GS400 with 172,000 miles. I have a transmission cooler and Amsoil synthetic fluid in place of the stock Toyota Type T-IV which burns and turns colors before 30,000 miles. That stuff is barely fluid in my opinion.

I am debating with the Enclave, but I am sure it won't hurt if I changed it. My Dad's 98 Cadillac Seville has synthetic fluid in it as standard equipment, and after 100,000 miles, the oil life monitor still says 100%.

My twins have a Nissan Sentra and a Hyundai Elantra GT. These transmissions were supposed to DIE if I didn't use the factory fluid, and they have not. I have synthetic fluid in both of them. The Hyundai has over 100,000 miles on it, and those transmissions usually die a lot sooner than that. Fluid is usually the culprit. My dealer said that tranny would fail if I didn't use the Diamond SP fluid they sell for 16 bucks a quart, and it has to be changed at 30,000 mile intervals. They were wrong.

The VW Beetle I had before those cars also ran superbly with Amsoil Universal Synthetic fluid. I feel it is the best in my vehicles.

I would say that the only transmission I wouldn't recommend using synthetic fluid in is the Nissan CVT's. That is a very special transmission, and even AMSOIL says that their fluid won't work in it. Too slippery, because the CVT's have to have a certain amount of grip on that internally submerged V belt inside.

Just my experiences
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
758 Posts
So far, I have had excellent experience with changing transmission fluid in a timely fashion and using a proper synthetic instead of "regular" transmission fluid.

Modern automatics, however, are somewhat more picky about which fluid to use, so I would make sure the synthetic fulfills the manufacturer requirements. Amsoil makes good products but has often been cited for not really being certified by manufacturers. The company's word for it may not be enough for some people.

Manufacturers have lists of "approved" or "certified" fluids that are available to most mechanics, dealers, and on the Internet.

TM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
I agree with your comments wholeheartedly. I guess most manufacturers do not want to give another company the proper kudos when they are trying to sell their own fluids.

I noticed this alot on my Lexus GS400. Toyota only wanted the TYPE T IV fluid for their cars and said everything else would fail. The Toyota stuff works, but it surely gets dirty in 30,000 miles. By contrast, the AMSOIL stays clean and the transmission shifts so nicely all the time. I am sold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
758 Posts
GSEREP1 said:
I agree with your comments wholeheartedly. I guess most manufacturers do not want to give another company the proper kudos when they are trying to sell their own fluids.

I noticed this alot on my Lexus GS400. Toyota only wanted the TYPE T IV fluid for their cars and said everything else would fail. The Toyota stuff works, but it surely gets dirty in 30,000 miles. By contrast, the AMSOIL stays clean and the transmission shifts so nicely all the time. I am sold.
I believe you would get good service from Amsoil products in most cases. There are exceptions where Amsoil claims to fulfill requirements but has not done the specific testing required by a manufacturer. This is rare but in the case of Pump Duse VW diesel engines, there has been a controversy in fulfilling the 505.01 requirement for these engines which I believe Amsoil has never done. It is apparently very specific and critical for its high pressure cam shafts powering the fuel injectors.

The Enclave has an oil-sensitive variable valve timing mechanism that requires, as far as I can tell, a GM6094M specification. This has to do with the flow characteristics of the oil. It is found in some regular and some synthetics but not all 5W30 oil has it.

Cheers.

TM
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top