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As mentioned in another post, this combination is most likely because the "peg" on the side of the brake pedal is worn down. As a result, it no longer returns the brake switch to the full "off" position, making the car's computer think you are driving with one foot always on the brake. This situation usually starts sporadically, but becomes more and more annoying as you continue to drive (thereby wearing the peg even more). The code you will see in your scanner will accuse the switch of being bad, and it might be, so test it first before replacing it or using the following fix.
You can have the computer recalibrated, for about $130 at the time of this post, but since the peg will continue to wear, this is really only a temporary fix. You can have the brake pedal replaced for a little bit more, this would be a longer fix to the problem, but there is an easier and cheaper way.

Go to a store and buy a pack of metal sewing bobbins, #5 size. The pack I bought had 4 bobbins for $1. You'll also need a small rotary tool (I used my wife's $10 craft one, so it doesn't need to be heavy duty at all), with a small grinder drum attached. You could use a rounded file, but it will take a bit longer. Also, optionally, some light oil.

The bobbins are the perfect size to fit over the peg on the side of the brake pedal, however, they're not to concerned about burrs at the bobbin factory. Use your rotary tool or file to smooth out the inside hole of the bobbin. Once it is smooth enough, it will slide onto the peg with just enough tolerance to spin easily. Now, use your rotary tool/file on the LOWER prong of the switch. This prong almost never actually touches the peg, so it has no real structural value. You want to widen the space between the prongs just enough to allow them to fit over the bobbin without pinching it. Again, this allows the bobbin to spin freely between the prongs.

Place the bobbin between the prongs of the switch (as shown below), and slip the whole thing over the peg and reattach. Add a drop or two of the oil between the peg and the bobbin, and between the bobbin and the prongs. The goal is to have the bobbin be able to spin easily when the switch moves. The metal of the bobbin isn't exactly high grade, but the switch will have a hard time cutting it if it can spin freely. It also spreads the "pressure" of the switch over a wider area of the peg. The bobbin's metal is thin enough that it just moves the switch far enough to put the whole thing back into specs.

I don't know how long the bobbin will actually last, but I still have 3 more to replace it if I need to, and at 25 cents apiece, I'm OK with that.

The pictures below show the basic idea. This is an unmodified switch, and as you can see, the bobbin will already actually fit into it, but not freely. You will only have to file off a very small amount of the prong, so test it often so as not to go any further than you need to.

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I did this about 2 months ago. All the problems were resolved, and so far, no problems. Hope this helps.
 

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As mentioned in another post, this combination is most likely because the "peg" on the side of the brake pedal is worn down. As a result, it no longer returns the brake switch to the full "off" position, making the car's computer think you are driving with one foot always on the brake. This situation usually starts sporadically, but becomes more and more annoying as you continue to drive (thereby wearing the peg even more). The code you will see in your scanner will accuse the switch of being bad, and it might be, so test it first before replacing it or using the following fix.
You can have the computer recalibrated, for about $130 at the time of this post, but since the peg will continue to wear, this is really only a temporary fix. You can have the brake pedal replaced for a little bit more, this would be a longer fix to the problem, but there is an easier and cheaper way.

Go to a store and buy a pack of metal sewing bobbins, #5 size. The pack I bought had 4 bobbins for $1. You'll also need a small rotary tool (I used my wife's $10 craft one, so it doesn't need to be heavy duty at all), with a small grinder drum attached. You could use a rounded file, but it will take a bit longer. Also, optionally, some light oil.

The bobbins are the perfect size to fit over the peg on the side of the brake pedal, however, they're not to concerned about burrs at the bobbin factory. Use your rotary tool or file to smooth out the inside hole of the bobbin. Once it is smooth enough, it will slide onto the peg with just enough tolerance to spin easily. Now, use your rotary tool/file on the LOWER prong of the switch. This prong almost never actually touches the peg, so it has no real structural value. You want to widen the space between the prongs just enough to allow them to fit over the bobbin without pinching it. Again, this allows the bobbin to spin freely between the prongs.

Place the bobbin between the prongs of the switch (as shown below), and slip the whole thing over the peg and reattach. Add a drop or two of the oil between the peg and the bobbin, and between the bobbin and the prongs. The goal is to have the bobbin be able to spin easily when the switch moves. The metal of the bobbin isn't exactly high grade, but the switch will have a hard time cutting it if it can spin freely. It also spreads the "pressure" of the switch over a wider area of the peg. The bobbin's metal is thin enough that it just moves the switch far enough to put the whole thing back into specs.

I don't know how long the bobbin will actually last, but I still have 3 more to replace it if I need to, and at 25 cents apiece, I'm OK with that.

The pictures below show the basic idea. This is an unmodified switch, and as you can see, the bobbin will already actually fit into it, but not freely. You will only have to file off a very small amount of the prong, so test it often so as not to go any further than you need to.

View attachment 6817 View attachment 6818

I did this about 2 months ago. All the problems were resolved, and so far, no problems. Hope this helps.
As mentioned in another post, this combination is most likely because the "peg" on the side of the brake pedal is worn down. As a result, it no longer returns the brake switch to the full "off" position, making the car's computer think you are driving with one foot always on the brake. This situation usually starts sporadically, but becomes more and more annoying as you continue to drive (thereby wearing the peg even more). The code you will see in your scanner will accuse the switch of being bad, and it might be, so test it first before replacing it or using the following fix.
You can have the computer recalibrated, for about $130 at the time of this post, but since the peg will continue to wear, this is really only a temporary fix. You can have the brake pedal replaced for a little bit more, this would be a longer fix to the problem, but there is an easier and cheaper way.

Go to a store and buy a pack of metal sewing bobbins, #5 size. The pack I bought had 4 bobbins for $1. You'll also need a small rotary tool (I used my wife's $10 craft one, so it doesn't need to be heavy duty at all), with a small grinder drum attached. You could use a rounded file, but it will take a bit longer. Also, optionally, some light oil.

The bobbins are the perfect size to fit over the peg on the side of the brake pedal, however, they're not to concerned about burrs at the bobbin factory. Use your rotary tool or file to smooth out the inside hole of the bobbin. Once it is smooth enough, it will slide onto the peg with just enough tolerance to spin easily. Now, use your rotary tool/file on the LOWER prong of the switch. This prong almost never actually touches the peg, so it has no real structural value. You want to widen the space between the prongs just enough to allow them to fit over the bobbin without pinching it. Again, this allows the bobbin to spin freely between the prongs.

Place the bobbin between the prongs of the switch (as shown below), and slip the whole thing over the peg and reattach. Add a drop or two of the oil between the peg and the bobbin, and between the bobbin and the prongs. The goal is to have the bobbin be able to spin easily when the switch moves. The metal of the bobbin isn't exactly high grade, but the switch will have a hard time cutting it if it can spin freely. It also spreads the "pressure" of the switch over a wider area of the peg. The bobbin's metal is thin enough that it just moves the switch far enough to put the whole thing back into specs.

I don't know how long the bobbin will actually last, but I still have 3 more to replace it if I need to, and at 25 cents apiece, I'm OK with that.

The pictures below show the basic idea. This is an unmodified switch, and as you can see, the bobbin will already actually fit into it, but not freely. You will only have to file off a very small amount of the prong, so test it often so as not to go any further than you need to.

View attachment 6817 View attachment 6818

I did this about 2 months ago. All the problems were resolved, and so far, no problems. Hope this helps.
Thanks for the information 👍 I will try it and hope it fixes it. Thanks again.
 
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