EnclaveForum.net: Buick Enclave Online Community banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Read it here:

http://www.windingroad.com/reviews-page/2008-buick-enclave-cxl/

Or Here: (I have bolded my favorite quotes)

Buick has jettisoned all three of its crossovers—the Rendezvous, Rainier, and Terraza—and in their place for 2008 there’s a single vehicle, the new Enclave. Enclave shares its underpinnings and powertrain with the Saturn Outlook and the GMC Acadia, but it’s by far the most stylish and carlike of the three. With the Enclave, Buick is taking dead aim at worthy upscale competitors like the Acura MDX, Audi Q7, Lexus RX350, Mercedes-Benz R350, and the Volvo XC90.

There are only two Enclave models, CX ($32,790) and CXL ($34,790), with one engine, the 3.6-liter twenty-four-valve V-6, and one transmission, the incredibly small, light, and capable 6T75 six-speed. All-wheel drive is available as a $2000 option on either version. We drove a loaded CXL AWD with a $43,530 sticker price.

The first thing we noticed about the Enclave CXL is its incredibly quiet demeanor. Buick has made much of its QuietTuning system of separation, insulation, and isolation on its two sedans, the Lucerne and LaCrosse, both of which are far easier to quiet down than a big empty box like our test vehicle. On the Enclave, Buick has taken the system into a new realm, seemingly isolating everything from everything else underneath. At interstate speeds, you can hear a mouse whispering in the third row.

The next thing we noticed about the Enclave is its straight-line performance. While Buick shares its 3.6-liter engine with a number of other General Motors products, the engine guys figured out a way to engineer a much taller intake manifold with straighter runners, and that gives the engine a bump, from 257 to 275 horsepower, a 7 percent power surge you can feel every time you stomp the big pedal. Buick claims a 0-60-mile-per-hour time of just over eight seconds, which is very, very good for a near-5000-pound family hauler (the wide-ratio six-speed really helps here).

We drove the Enclave in the neighborhoods south and west of St. Louis, out through farm country and down into the fringes of Mark Twain National Forest in the Ozarks, where things get rocky and curvy at about the same time. On these winding roads, the Enclave really comes into its own. The suspension system is far more sophisticated, far sharper in handling, and far more compliant and comfortable than what we expected.

The cast-aluminum, H-arm rear suspension is especially complex and expensive, designed to work with or without the rear-drive portion of the all-wheel-drive system, using elaborate arms to put the wheels out as far as possible and allow for a wide, flat load floor. With coil-over struts and a monster stabilizer bar up front and the H-arms in the rear, the Enclave steers more precisely and stays flatter than most crossovers in this price class. The steering isn’t over-boosted into next month, but it isn’t needle-sharp, either: nice, hefty, weighty, and reasonably accurate. The standard tires are big, fat 255/60R-18 rollers on the CX or 255/60R-19s on the CXL, with twenty-inch wheels and tires in the dealer parts catalog, if you must.

The computer-controlled all-wheel-drive system operates full time depending on road speed, throttle position, and the relative speeds of each of the four tires. The default torque split is 90/10 front/rear, but Buick says it operates between 40/60 and 60/40 in most driving and can divert 100 percent of available torque to the rear wheels when needed. It’s what makes cornering so much fun in the Enclave.

The Enclave looks like it belongs in the same showroom with the Buick sedans, sporting a protruding vertical-bar grille and brand-correct portholes on the hood. The body is much curvier than its stablemates, with exaggerated wheel flares and a convex backlight that stretches the glass past the boundaries of the tailgate opening for a clean, modern look.

The cabin, which can be configured for either seven or eight passengers, is also modern, crisp, and functional. Buyers can specify either a bench seat or second-row captain’s chairs, which can be ordered with a floor console between them. GM’s Smart Slide feature allows easy entry into the third row by flopping the seats forward with a sliding fore/aft adjustment. The instruments and analog clock are very highly styled, with a soft, bluegreen illumination that is repeated on the headlamps, and halo lighting around the numerals at night. The graphics are large and clear, and the wood on the steering wheel is real mahogany.

Crossovers are about usable space, and the Enclave packs nineteen cubic feet of cargo room behind the third row, sixty-six cubic feet with the third-row seats down and 115 cubic feet with both rows folded. There’s still more storage on top of the dash for sunglasses, iPods, and cell phones, or under the rear cargo floor—about four more cubic feet. Buick says the Enclave has more total cargo volume than the MDX, Q7, RX350, or XC90.

The crossover segment is the hottest in the business right now, and this time Buick came to play. Pound for pound (and there are lots of pounds), [size=10pt]inch for inch, and feature for feature, this may be the best Buick ever built[/size], and some $4000 cheaper than the competition.
 
A

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
There's no question that pretty much all (non biased) media loves this thing, and with good reason!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,514 Posts
:thumb: :thumb: Now THAT'S what I am talking about. This guy's obviously not on the payroll of Toyonda like so many of the other auto writers. Exactly my thoughts of this vehicle.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top