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Discussion Starter #1
I was a bit freaked out tonight. I was polishing the hood of our E and after doing the first step with an orange polishing pad, I thought the pad looked funny. I took out a yellow pad to work with a slight scratch in one spot, and after I got done I freaked out as I saw the pad turned partly pink. I had noticed this the first time I polished it in the spring with a white pad, but I thought it was from another car that I was thinking had single stage paint. So I'm examining the hood, looking for where I burned through the clear, but found nothing. After some research online, I found that the red jewel is a special multiple stage paint like the white diamond where the clear is tinted. Interesting... I did a test spot with a white rag by hand, and sure enough it turned pink as well. So I sighed with relief.

So long story short, if you polish your paint and the pad turns pink, it's normal, so don't freak out. Not sure, you would get white on a colored pad polishing a white diamond E, but it's probably possible.
 

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With the white diamond I only had the top coat and I did a touch-up fine, because the white was still intact. I dabbed the white diamond on blue painters tape, and it came out silver. I have since gotten white touch up from that gmpartsdirect. I'm ready for WWIII as I have two whites and three white diamond tubes! My wife and I are so careful I bet 10 years from now they would have done nothing but sit in the drawer... :)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yes, I think they are Lake Country if I recall. I was using Menzerna polish with a Porter Cable DA.
 

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Grimm said:
I was a bit freaked out tonight. I was polishing the hood of our E and after doing the first step with an orange polishing pad, I thought the pad looked funny. I took out a yellow pad to work with a slight scratch in one spot, and after I got done I freaked out as I saw the pad turned partly pink. I had noticed this the first time I polished it in the spring with a white pad, but I thought it was from another car that I was thinking had single stage paint. So I'm examining the hood, looking for where I burned through the clear, but found nothing. After some research online, I found that the red jewel is a special multiple stage paint like the white diamond where the clear is tinted. Interesting... I did a test spot with a white rag by hand, and sure enough it turned pink as well. So I sighed with relief.

So long story short, if you polish your paint and the pad turns pink, it's normal, so don't freak out. Not sure, you would get white on a colored pad polishing a white diamond E, but it's probably possible.
Since I am the 2nd owner of my 08, I cannot say how often it was waxed. But the first time I did a thorough clean/wash and wax. But, I ran into the same issue of pink coloring on the white buffing pad, even after this E being 5 years old.
 

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The GM paint is not very good imho, so I don't worry about it. Run your hand over a brand new car (if it's not yours, maybe a brand new loaner, we got a Encore brand spanking new). We even have some sand under the paint near the rear door, above the right tail.

It still deserves wax, of course, your friends probably do not come over and run their fingers over your paint! :happy:

(It's funny on the BMW forums people have complained about the orange peel and enviro paint, yet after 8 years on the road that stuff is smooth as glass)
 

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After 7 years ungaraged, my Gold Mist Enclave still looks very good. All I've done to care for the paint is to run it though a high tech car wash a few times each year.
 

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After owning my 09 Enclave for almost 4 years, and countless waxings, I never took any paint off that would result in a pink pad. I used Zaino religiously and clay barred the vehicle twice over the years and used AIO plus Z-3 with either the gloss enhancer or Z-6 and Z-8. The last two years I also used Z-CS and ZFX Accelerator. With these clear coated cars unless they just get so weathered, rarely needs a polish, just good washing techniques and a good paint sealant. I've even put carnauba over the Zaino stuff for a carazy shine that would last about 2 weeks or so before the wax finally washed off
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I've only had pink on the pad from polishing, not waxing. Most people don't follow a proper washing procedure to keep from swirling/scratching the paint, so most cars can use a polishing every year.
 

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Grimm said:
I've only had pink on the pad from polishing, not waxing. Most people don't follow a proper washing procedure to keep from swirling/scratching the paint, so most cars can use a polishing every year.
I'd be interested to know what you consider to be a "proper washing procedure" as I'm a new Red Jewel Enclave owner and would like to know. I want to keep my new to me E nice for the entire time I own the vehicle. For some reason the car wash just doesn't seem appropriate for this "Jewel" - pun intended.

So, please detail your detail. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
When I said most people don't follow proper procedure, it probably came across as they are doing it wrong, but for most people, the process they use is fine for their standards. If you are more OCD about the appearance of your vehicle like me, it will take some different procedures or additional steps to keep the paint looking it's best. Number one is to keep the car from any automatic car wash that isn't touchless. The bristles, and even the soft brushes, are going to be hard on the paint.

The best process is to wash it by hand. The biggest enemy to the paint during washing is dirt. The easiest way to keep a nice finish is to use two buckets. One with soap/water, and one with rinse water. Wash a panel of the car (after a good pre rinse), and then dunk the mitt in the rinse water. Also rub the mitt with your hand, or use a grit guard in the bottom to try to remove any dirt in the mitt before putting it back into the soap. When you are finished, use a quality microfiber towel to dry. A tried method of testing your towel is to rub it on a music CD. If it leaves scratches, it will scratch the clear coat on your paint. The next step that many people don't know about, is to use a clay bar after you dry the car. That will remove stuck particles in the paint like stains, paint from other car doors, water spots, or rail dust (those rust color specs). After that you can wax for the bling. Wax is also very key to keeping the paint looking good. Dirt and other junk has a hard time sticking to the paint if there is a good wax layer. That will make washing much easier, and less abrasive on the paint. There are other more tedious procedures you can employ as well. There is a whole plethora of ways you can wash the car so you are touching the paint as little as possible. One I use often is to blow the car dry with a leaf blower. That way I'm not rubbing a towel on the paint as much.

That right there will keep your car looking better than half the cars on the road. If you want to take it further, have the car polished (or do it yourself) once a year. No matter how fanatical you are at washing, you will get some swirls on the paint. If you don't know what I mean, on a bright sunny day, go find a dark colored car and look at it with the sun to your back and you'll see these circular fine scratches all over the car. They are also referred to as spider webs, as they look just like a web. If you do a periodic polish and keep it waxed, when your Enclave is ten years old, it will look as good as it did the day it was built.
 

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Grimm said:
When I said most people don't follow proper procedure, it probably came across as they are doing it wrong, but for most people, the process they use is fine for their standards. If you are more OCD about the appearance of your vehicle like me, it will take some different procedures or additional steps to keep the paint looking it's best. Number one is to keep the car from any automatic car wash that isn't touchless. The bristles, and even the soft brushes, are going to be hard on the paint.

The best process is to wash it by hand. The biggest enemy to the paint during washing is dirt. The easiest way to keep a nice finish is to use two buckets. One with soap/water, and one with rinse water. Wash a panel of the car (after a good pre rinse), and then dunk the mitt in the rinse water. Also rub the mitt with your hand, or use a grit guard in the bottom to try to remove any dirt in the mitt before putting it back into the soap. When you are finished, use a quality microfiber towel to dry. A tried method of testing your towel is to rub it on a music CD. If it leaves scratches, it will scratch the clear coat on your paint. The next step that many people don't know about, is to use a clay bar after you dry the car. That will remove stuck particles in the paint like stains, paint from other car doors, water spots, or rail dust (those rust color specs). After that you can wax for the bling. Wax is also very key to keeping the paint looking good. Dirt and other junk has a hard time sticking to the paint if there is a good wax layer. That will make washing much easier, and less abrasive on the paint. There are other more tedious procedures you can employ as well. There is a whole plethora of ways you can wash the car so you are touching the paint as little as possible. One I use often is to blow the car dry with a leaf blower. That way I'm not rubbing a towel on the paint as much.

That right there will keep your car looking better than half the cars on the road. If you want to take it further, have the car polished (or do it yourself) once a year. No matter how fanatical you are at washing, you will get some swirls on the paint. If you don't know what I mean, on a bright sunny day, go find a dark colored car and look at it with the sun to your back and you'll see these circular fine scratches all over the car. They are also referred to as spider webs, as they look just like a web. If you do a periodic polish and keep it waxed, when your Enclave is ten years old, it will look as good as it did the day it was built.
I thought I knew how to keep and maintain a vehicle but the explanation you gave is light years ahead of anything I've ever done. I never thought to use two buckets and never seen or heard of one that has a grit guard. I knew about not letting the water dry on any vehicle, etc. Learned a lot from experience too, but nothing like this.

BTW- I've been the proud owner of leather interior before and think I know what I'm doing there as well but now you have me second guessing myself. Hmmmm...any suggestions there as well?

Another thing that always baffles me is how do dealerships get these used cars to have that "new car smell" again? I got very lucky with my E as the previous owner was just a meticulous as I am and anal about things as I am so I know with all the service records that were left that she took very good care of it. 2010 Red Jewel Buick Enclave CXL with only 47,500 miles on it when I got it 2 weeks ago. The wife loves it and has already put 1,000 miles on it. I told her that isn't going to continue to happen...haha. Anyway, I'm out but very interested in your expertise. Forgive me if it is posted elsewhere in the forum.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Yeah, head over to Autopia.org or Autogeek.net if you really want your mind blown on how people take care of their cars. There is one old guy that has a very particular regimen that he follows on some of his cars to minimize touching the paint. He foams the car first with a power washer (yes, there are foam cannons you can get that are said to work awesome), then he uses a very soft lambs wool mitt, and he'll put the water hose inside the mitt along with soap and just barely touch the surface of the paint. Then there are boars hair brushes that you can use that are very soft, and of course expensive. The list goes on. I'm not that fanatical, nor do I have that kind of time. LOL.

Both sites have a product section where you can buy anything you would ever need. Highly recommend both. For washing, I bought a grit guard (like $15) on Autogeek, and then just bought a Home Depot bucket. It fits perfectly in the bottom. Basically it's about six inches high so any dirt that falls to the bottom stays below the surface of the guard. And it's constructed in a way that when the water gets stirred up when you use it, the dirt should stay below the guard.

As far as leather, I'm not much of an expert there. I've use leather cleaner from time to time, but mostly I just wipe it down every so often to keep it clean and have good luck. I haven't tried it yet, but a lot of people recommend using Woolite mixed with water for cleaning the leather. No conditioning is really necessary if you keep it clean with most cars since the leather has a coating on it. If you have real leather in an expensive luxury car, that is another matter.
 

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Grimm said:
Yeah, head over to Autopia.org or Autogeek.net if you really want your mind blown on how people take care of their cars. There is one old guy that has a very particular regimen that he follows on some of his cars to minimize touching the paint. He foams the car first with a power washer (yes, there are foam cannons you can get that are said to work awesome), then he uses a very soft lambs wool mitt, and he'll put the water hose inside the mitt along with soap and just barely touch the surface of the paint. Then there are boars hair brushes that you can use that are very soft, and of course expensive. The list goes on. I'm not that fanatical, nor do I have that kind of time. LOL.

Both sites have a product section where you can buy anything you would ever need. Highly recommend both. For washing, I bought a grit guard (like $15) on Autogeek, and then just bought a Home Depot bucket. It fits perfectly in the bottom. Basically it's about six inches high so any dirt that falls to the bottom stays below the surface of the guard. And it's constructed in a way that when the water gets stirred up when you use it, the dirt should stay below the guard.

As far as leather, I'm not much of an expert there. I've use leather cleaner from time to time, but mostly I just wipe it down every so often to keep it clean and have good luck. I haven't tried it yet, but a lot of people recommend using Woolite mixed with water for cleaning the leather. No conditioning is really necessary if you keep it clean with most cars since the leather has a coating on it. If you have real leather in an expensive luxury car, that is another matter.
Will be visiting those sites now.. Thanks Grimm. Nice to chat with ya. I'll see ya around the site I'm sure. :thumb:
 
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