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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thursday i am taking it in for some minor issues, brake peddle is squeaking like a hungry canary, where the seat belt comes out it has sliced into the plastic, was holding out but now it is noticeable and lastly hopefully to get the "newest" tranny update! Ooops forgot, the rotors are pulsing.....this ought to be interesting regarding their decision to cut them or replace them. GM likes to cut and wont give you the option to replace even though it is a bumper to bumper warranty......puttin my boxing gloves on now.....
 

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All minor things, but hopefully easily taken care of. As far as the brakes, it is true that the practice is to cut them and not replace BECAUSE not only is it cheaper, but in real world practice, that most often cures the issues of most that never return. Case in point, an '02 Avalanche we had. Developed a shake after a few thousand miles, the dealer cut the rotors, and never had another issue again on that heavy truck through the day we traded it 2+ years later with 33k on it.

Further, it's not just that dealers wouldn't replace (though, being knowledgeable, they too know cutting them hurts nothing especially if it's the first time), but GM watches everything they do, replace, etc. like hawks when it's a warranty repair, so they can only do so much.

That all said, if your dealer is good, all should be handled with little or no issue--especially since the squeak, cut, etc. are pretty obvious.
 

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caddycruiser said:
As far as the brakes, it is true that the practice is to cut them and not replace BECAUSE not only is it cheaper, but in real world practice, that most often cures the issues of most that never return. Case in point, an '02 Avalanche we had. Developed a shake after a few thousand miles, the dealer cut the rotors, and never had another issue again on that heavy truck through the day we traded it 2+ years later with 33k on it.
Educate me here. Why would cutting a rotor, thus making it thinner, make it so the warpage does not return. I'm not disputing it, I just don't understand it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Caddy Cruiser,

I know what you are stating but in the end it is a 4 year 48000 mile warranty, bumper to bumper. I expect it to be honored for a porduct that isn't living up to its potential if it is defective! Secondly I have a 2006 Pontiac G6 that has had the rotors cut twice now and i only have 22000 miles on it, so I cant agree that if cut it wont return....
 

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We call it "turning the rotors" here. The rotor mates to the pad. Both surfaces, pad and metallic rotor come together like super-flat cymbals when you hit the brakes. If one or the other is not perfectly flat they do not "mate" together. The common term around here is a "warped rotor". The mechanic takes off the rotor and carries it to a special lathe machine designed for this task. The rotor face turns on the lathe like a CD. The cutting blade carefully sweeps across the surface, removing metal as it goes in and out until the surface is perfectly flat. Since mating to a warped rotor can screw up the flat surface of a pad, you will probably be advised to put new pads on so you get the flattest, most perfect mating surfaces.

As you can guess there are only so many times you can turn/cut a rotor's face before it is too thin to use. The mechanic will measure the depth of the rotor using a micrometer and use a special number table to see if the rotor can be trimmed down even more. It saves you money since a new rotor will cost much more than the charge to fix (flatten) the rotor. A very common procedure done at any shop that services brakes.

Here is a video.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mXGlH2Us200
 

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Clave Man:

I am not sure if you were responding to me or someone else. I get the concept of turning rotors, I just don't understand why turning them thus making them thinner and changing nothing else, solves the problem. Whatever caused the warpage in the first place should still be present and made worse by the thinner rotor, should it not?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
zman said:
Clave Man:

I am not sure if you were responding to me or someone else. I get the concept of turning rotors, I just don't understand why turning them thus making them thinner and changing nothing else, solves the problem. Whatever caused the warpage in the first place should still be present and made worse by the thinner rotor, should it not?
:ditto: I am fully aware of how rotors are cut and why, I am glad your aurora hasnt had to be cut until 35000 miles, I am just letting others know of some issues I am having and attempting to see if others are having the same issue! People are starting to get some mileage on their vehicle and I hope not but am certain problems will begin to manifest themselves that havent before this point in time, the old wear and tear concept :thumb:
 

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zman said:
Clave Man:

I am not sure if you were responding to me or someone else. I get the concept of turning rotors, I just don't understand why turning them thus making them thinner and changing nothing else, solves the problem. Whatever caused the warpage in the first place should still be present and made worse by the thinner rotor, should it not?
Clave Mans explanation is about as good as it gets.
The cause of the warped rotor was probably simply in the manufacturing process. Brake rotors like anything else are not always "perfect" when manufactured. A warped rotor can usually be trued up without removing a significant amount of metal.
 

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43sbest said:
Clave Mans explanation is about as good as it gets.
The cause of the warped rotor was probably simply in the manufacturing process. Brake rotors like anything else are not always "perfect" when manufactured. A warped rotor can usually be trued up without removing a significant amount of metal.
OK, but I still don't see how a manufacturing defect will manifest itself after 5,000 - 30,000 miles and be fixed by only a turning of the rotors and nothing else, but hey, I never claimed to be an auto mechanic. I would think a manufacturing defect would show up right away in a rotor if there were not pad or caliper issues (or something like that).

Call me dense I guess.

Thanks.
 

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PAPoPo said:
I dont think anyone was looking for an explanation....wtf am I missing here???
I assume that is directed at me! Can't we carry on a discussion without personal attacks. The "wtf" is not necessary!! If you don't think my post is relevant just pass over it.; it wasn't directed at you.
Hope you have a nice evening.
 

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zman said:
OK, but I still don't see how a manufacturing defect will manifest itself after 5,000 - 30,000 miles and be fixed by only a turning of the rotors and nothing else, but hey, I never claimed to be an auto mechanic. I would think a manufacturing defect would show up right away in a rotor if there were not pad or caliper issues (or something like that).

Call me dense I guess.

Thanks.
I sure don't think your dense.
I'm in the same boat as you when it comes to being an auto mechanic but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
It wasn't a personal attack but the thread wasnt started to ask how they cut rotors. I didn't ask how are rotors cut, that is where the "wtf am I missing here" is coming from.......
 

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LOL !!! Easy guys. Posts always "drift" a bit and new thoughts/experiences always occur. Don't let simple text message expressions rile ya! They're not meant literally. If someone wants to insult someone, you'll know it! ;)


Zman's question and PAPoPo's observations/concerns are both legit. We trade ideas here, no? :eyebrow:

Hope the re-surfacing of the rotors does the job for PAPoPo. As Caddycruiser related, it worked for him! But Z's question is still afloat. How does cutting(thinning) rotors fix it??

I've done many brake jobs, on my own cars, till 10 years ago. If I may, I would like to speculate that just "cutting" the rotors alone won't fix an unknown variable like a bad caliper (doesn't fully release, thus heats up/warps rotor excessively). However if that caliper got cleaned of sand and lubed............problem solved! Only time will tell. And it is covered under 4 year/50K warranty, if a new rotor is eventually needed. Worn pads however, may not be. Anybody can "ride" the brakes and wear them prematurely.

Hope that helps this valid concern get aired w/o anybody insulting anybody! This may be a more common issue as we put more miles on our Enclaves.

JMHO ;D Now GBTW! (get back to work)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
thx smokin for putting it into perspective, now I must go do a much more complicated job, putting together a new gas grill....arghhh....
 

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Warped rotors are usually caused by overheating which is often caused by excess braking. We live in the Rocky Mountains and it is not uncommon to see vehicles with smoking brakes after coming down from the pass. The local service station does a booming business in brake jobs. To increase the life of your brakes use your tranny to brake on downhills - that's what the "L" mode is for. I've done this for years and have never needed a brake job yet.
 

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Doesn't WTF mean "what's that for?" ;) ;D Moving along................

I also use the manumatic to downshift, all the time, on hills. I think Bsox knows this too ;) :thumb:
 

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Yes, Bsox does know about the L mode for downshifting, he also knows that if you leave this particular vehicle in the D mode and are braking on a downhill, there are sensors that register this causing your Enclave to downshift automatically and hold it there until your braking has lessened. Because of this, you don't need to use the L mode and do it manually. In fact, this feature does not function in the L mode. That being said, I still have a bad shimmy when braking right as it slows to 35 mph, but not at other speeds.
 

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I'm sorry you guys are having that problem and it can be very annoying to say the least. Sure messes up an otherwise great ride. I can see GM's point of turning the rotors, but is would seem to me to lessen the life expectancy of the brakes in the long run.

I've had brake specialists tell me for years to avoid panic stops (overheating the brakes) and also to avoid water puddles if the rotors do become hot as the heat/cold can warp rotors. Now that means we can't drive the vehicles. Chicken and egg theory.

Anyway, Papopo, best of luck to you and bsox with your brake issues.

While we are on this subject, don't forget to rotate you tires often so as not to wear the edges off the tires. I rotate every 7,000 miles. City driving could be very hard on tires and brakes and rotation should retard the wear and tear issue.
 
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