EnclaveForum.net: Buick Enclave Online Community banner

1 - 20 of 428 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,825 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
THIS THREAD WAS A SPIN OFF OF DISCUSSIONS ABOUT KITCHEN REMODELS THAT STARTED IN SAILFISH'S "VUE" TOPIC:

Re Kitchen: Not sure where you are on budget, but if you are able to, just have someone contracted to do the work. We worked with our guy, but it gets long doing the work yourself. I was very stressed out and ready for it to be done halfway thru. Our remodel included: taking out non-bearing spindle wall, wallpaper removed/new paint, new plugs/switches, new cabinets, additional cabinets and counter where there was none, new sink...and added a small bar sink on the new counter area, new lighting (recessed lights), new floor (Pergo type simulated hard wood), new doors (pantry, front closet, pocket door to basement), new overhead microwave, new stove. Things we did ourselves:

Stripped wallpaper and repainted walls.
Went to store to buy all the materials (several trips)
Helped with laying tile for back splash.
Helped install floor (wife did that.....I had enough by that point).
Basically was the guy's helper for anything else. He built all the cabinets in his garage, then brought them here, but still needed help bringing them in, holding them up while he attached them, etc. Many things to do when you are helping.

Again, all comes down to budget. We did ours for a total of $17K plus our labor. That figure includes his labor, materials, and appliances. (We got new oven and microwave, but didn't get the new refrigerator till a couple years later). Still have original dishwasher that was in the house when we bought it. Guessing the dishwasher is from the mid 90's....looks good and still works. Will replace that when needed.

A new kitchen can totally change the look of a house, and something you will enjoy for years. Tip....don't skimp to save just a few bucks if you think you won't truly enjoy the materials you choose. So far we are happy with what we chose, but could have gone much better on counter material. (used laminate which is perfectly fine, but someone looking to buy our house would probably whine that there's no granite). Thing is, you can't go too expensive for what the house can support. Our home is just not a granite counter type, that would be overkill....my opinion.

Next will be our bathrooms, which are not horrible, but I hate the floors and would like new cabinets and new tub surround in the main, etc. Another day! Waiting for house values to swing upwards before we do any other large project.

Have fun picking out all the necessary materials, that part IS fun. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,405 Posts
Re: kitchen remodeling

Probably in the range of $40,000 or so. We usually do an improvement project yearly but haven't the last 2 years so what we would normally spend has been socked back to be used for the remodeled kitchen.

Back in 2006 we joined a national buying group and over the years have saved a TON of money, on furniture (living room/family room/bedroom)/hardwood flooring (living room and dining room)/small appliances/bathroom fixtures (half bath)/light fixtures, over what these items sell for in retail establishments. Name brand items as well. We listened to their "sales speech" back then and my husband is the one who made the decision to join. It has paid off...it really has.

Our membership is good for 10 years so this next year...is the one for the kitchen. Which is why I need to find an architect for the blue-print which is required before we can order the cabinets and such.

I am thinking soapstone for the counter tops. I like marble but it can be too porous and since I like red wine I can see red spots all over, not a good thing. Granite is hard, but, I have had a couple friends complain that they have broken more wine glasses on their granite, snapped off the stem. I kind of chuckle thinking too much wine but...I can't say for sure.

We both like the simple craftsman style cabinets http://www.houzz.com/photos/craftsman/kitchen but still trying to decide if stained cabinets or painted cabinets.

I have been looking at both options and ran across this the other day. The cabinets are not Craftsman but the color combination is something I like. http://www.houzz.com/photos/2403175/Storage-Ideas-traditional-kitchen-phoenix

Still a while before making the final decision but it should be an interesting experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,825 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Re: kitchen remodeling

All nice. Soapstone? Have not heard of that....you've sparked my curiosity. Perhaps you should start a new thread sometime about your new kitchen. I believe it would get some good discussion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,405 Posts
Re: kitchen remodeling

kidsenclave said:
All nice. Soapstone? Have not heard of that....you've sparked my curiosity. Perhaps you should start a new thread sometime about your new kitchen. I believe it would get some good discussion.

I was thinking about that and perhaps GoldEnclave or MRBUICK could move these threads over to the new one.

So...here I go...new topic. Kitchen Remodel Ideas???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,405 Posts
My husband and I are planning on a total kitchen gut job next year. Expanding our small galley kitchen into the family room and making it one large totally functioning kitchen.

I love to cook and just do not have enough room or enough storage.

You can kind of get a feel for the size of our kitchen through the photo below. Then the one after is the family room which is right next to the kitchen.

That is my friend Lisa with my husband behind her.




You can see part of the family room, with the half wall behind the sofa the galley kitchen.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,065 Posts
We gutted and totally remodeled our kitchen in 2007. We bought the house in 1989.
To give you an idea how dysfunctional it was, the kitchen is 221 sq ft (13x17), but had only 6 feet of counter space :help:
We worked within the same footprint, but changed the layout completely, plumbing, electrical, everything. Our house was built in 1927, and the kitchen had a makeshift remodel I would guess sometime in the 60's or 70's.

The single best advise is to seek professional help for the layout/expansion. We went to 3 kitchen designers over a 3 month period. We avoided the chain stores like Home Depot and Lowes and went straight to the kitchen pros.
Take your time, and don't be afraid to make changes as you go along. We received some great advice from both the designers and our contractor.
Shop contractors, but don't necessarily go with the lowest quote. Get references, and check them out, we did!

We went high end on our kitchen, with top end finishes and a 6 burner 36" Viking range (wife wanted that), and hardwood floors. We figured that we would do only one kitchen remodel in our lifetime, and wanted to do it right. We spent more money on this kitchen, than we spent for our first house in 1983.

We were very fortunate with our contractor, demolition to completion in 10 weeks.
From the start of planning, to completion was about 6 months. Again I say, take your time and do it right the first time.

MRBUICK
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,164 Posts
Re: kitchen remodeling

Sailfish said:
I was thinking about that and perhaps GoldEnclave or MRBUICK could move these threads over to the new one.

So...here I go...new topic. Kitchen Remodel Ideas???
Done. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,405 Posts
Re: kitchen remodeling

GoldEnclave said:

AWESOME! Thanks a bunch!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,405 Posts
MRBUICK thanks for the advice! That is the plan to talk with 2 or 3 kitchen designers. I have been looking some up within the Dayton/Cincinnati market online through "Houzz". Many have references included but...one can never be too careful.

As for contractors that is definitely something to check out. I may have an edge up, or perhaps not, as I grew up in sawdust. My Father was a contractor, owned his own construction business and I was around a lot of construction work he performed on homes/businesses as well as the home I grew up in.

I have a plumber in mind, one who my Father would contract and this company even repaired the sink faucet at my Mother's house last October. Nice guy and a very good company.

Electrician, the one Father used has been long gone so I will have to do some serious research on this.

Of course making sure all the permits are acquired and posted is a must.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,065 Posts
Our general contractor hired all the sub-contractors, electrical, plumbing, flooring etc and took full responsibility for the work being done to our satisfaction. The subs he used have been working for him for years. He also took care of all permits and inspections. Of course if you want to be the GC, all that responsibility is yours.
(Our total budget, materials and labor, was around $75,000, but that included re-doing basement stairs and moving windows. Remember that this was a total gut job, walls to the studs, ceiling to the floor joists, 6 layers of flooring removed, right to the sub-floor.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,405 Posts
MRBUICK said:
Our general contractor hired all the sub-contractors, electrical, plumbing, flooring etc and took full responsibility for the work being done to our satisfaction. The subs he used have been working for him for years. He also took care of all permits and inspections. Of course if you want to be the GC, all that responsibility is yours.
(Our total budget, materials and labor, was around $75,000, but that included re-doing basement stairs and moving windows)
WOW! We will be re-doing the lower level in order to accommodate the family room, which will be part of the kitchen. The only thing down there is to clear out stuff which has accumulated rip up the carpet and lay new flooring, paint the walls/ceiling and move the family room furniture downstairs. That in it self should take up a week of our time.

Since our windows/sliding patio we replaced in 2004 that expense is in the past.

Probably will oversee what is going on as I no longer work and will be home during the renovation. Just have to make sure the contractors don't mind listening to my suggestions. Which having everything drawn out and on a blue print, with measurements/electrical outlets/plumbing (staying in the same spot) should make it a breeze....okay being optimistic I guess.

In going through the papers in my parents home I ran across some blue prints my Father did when he designed homes/additions and some commercial buildings. I still remember sitting across from him as he drew the plans for many of his jobs. Sometimes I wish I would have been asked if I was interested in working with him. I would have jumped at that chance as it was always so fascinating to me.

I guess that is why I really never fussed that much about all the wood working equipment and such in the garage....LOL...which still has a bunch of wood my husband has never moved out into his own workshop out back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,825 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
MRBUICK said:
Our general contractor hired all the sub-contractors, electrical, plumbing, flooring etc and took full responsibility for the work being done to our satisfaction. The subs he used have been working for him for years. He also took care of all permits and inspections. Of course if you want to be the GC, all that responsibility is yours.
(Our total budget, materials and labor, was around $75,000, but that included re-doing basement stairs and moving windows. Remember that this was a total gut job, walls to the studs, ceiling to the floor joists, 6 layers of flooring removed, right to the sub-floor.)
Sounds like a big job. We didn't get any permits because we weren't changing anything to the structure of the house. Only wall we removed wasn't a load bearing one, just kind of a half wall with post and then spindles. Once we removed that, it really gave us more room for our kitchen table.

Here's a question: We are talking about what each other's kitchen jobs cost....more importantly....I would be interested to know what people's opinions are on how much should be spent based on a percentage of the house's value. If I'm doing my math right, our kitchen was just above 14% of what we "paid" for the house. Who knows what it was worth at the time we were doing the job, but in today's numbers....unfortunately, the price we paid in 2000 for the house is very similar to what homes in this area are going for now.

Since we never got quotes from anyone else, not sure if we saved by going with an independent "jack of all trades" person. One thing I know is, the cabinets were custom made by him (whether that really makes a difference or not) for what we wanted. The old cabinets were so cheaply made we didn't want to go the route of refacing because they were junk. BUT....good enough for the garage, so we put some of those old cabinets for extra garage storage. :D

You're going to get all sorts of opinions here, and quite frankly.....pretty much everything I'm writing about our kitchen I realize is just for conversation. Each kitchen is unique, and everyone's taste is unique as well. But from another angle, might be helpful to see some of our member's finished remodels for the possibility you could get ideas from them. When I get a chance, I'll try and snap a couple photos. Regardless of the $$$ scale of any job, still neat to see what people have done.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,065 Posts
The cost of the remodel (75K) in 2007 was about 12% of the house value at that time. We did not over-improve for the neighborhood, as there was new construction (tear downs)in the neighborhood at the time going for $800K to $850K.
We did suffer about 20% depreciation in the real estate bust, but the values have recovered almost 100%. In fact, the tear downs have started again. That is a real sign of recovery, even though it is sad to see some of history disappear. Our neighborhood ranges from 1885 to current, and was not built as a development. Lots were sold off like a patchwork quilt, with lots ranging mostly from 1/4 acre to 1 acre. We have a great variety of housing styles, everything from Victorians and English Tudors, to Cape Cods and ranch houses. The capes & ranches are usually the ones being torn down, as the older more stately homes have escaped that fate
Remember, we have an advantage, a direct rail line to New York City. These areas of NJ have recovered better than other areas.

MRBUICK
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
21,164 Posts
MRBUICK, I am glad to read that your home value hasn't suffered too much and has recovered so well since the Great Recession. My neighborhood lost only about 20%-25% of its peak value, which was also a pretty low loss. Based on recent neighborhood real estate deals, my impression is that prices are down only about 10% from the peak in 2006. I am also relatively fortunate to live relatively close to major roads, highways, and rail stations. Additionally, there are a few surrounding wealthy towns that seem to always weather real estate downturns well, and my neighborhood is blessed with one of their mailing addresses which bolsters my town's home values. :thumb:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,825 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
OK here are pics of our kitchen. Much lower scale in comparison to what others are speaking of but just for sake of showing what we did for $17K:

(Pics are low quality from a phone.....sorry)
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,825 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
GoldEnclave said:
That looks nice, especially for the investment price. :thumb:
Thanks, the pics look better on the phone...LOL. As long as you don't expand them....just was trying to get quick pics shown. Could have waited for my wife to take some with her new camera she got for Christmas...but oh well, you get the idea.

The little bar sink I show (added the pic above) was an afterthought....something that came along during the project and we wanted it. The main sink is over by the window, but this one I use all the time to rinse cans or bottles, to wash hands, etc. Also, it's very close to the door to the garage, so I can quickly sneak in and wash hands after coming in from outside without going over by where the dishes/food prep area is. That photo that shows the bar counter with glass cabinet above was something where we had nothing there before. It's really added to our cabinet storage....it would be hard to go back to not having that area.

Mr.Buick: Thanks for breaking it down to percentages. That's easier to think about, since house prices are so different person to person, area to area. You're at 12% and we are around 14% of house value, for the kitchen remodel, pretty close. Wonder if there's a "guide" somewhere to what's the norm....but at the end of the day, if the project is more about what the homeowner wants, not about just value....then it's more important to have a kitchen you can enjoy for years and that works for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,405 Posts
Kids nice looking kitchen remodel. Thanks for sharing.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,065 Posts
A lot depends on how long you plan on staying in the house.
We went high end, and made some color choices that may not "resell" well. However we plan on this being our forever home, so the choices we made were to please ourselves, not some future buyer in 20 or more years.
In addition, we would not have installed a $6000 red Viking range in a $75,000 kitchen in a neighborhood that would not support it.
We are comfortable with our decisions, and in hindsight, we would NOT change a thing.
The area is in high demand for NY commuters with a train station within walking distance from most anywhere in the town. We have been here almost 25 years, and plan on being here 25 more!
 
1 - 20 of 428 Posts
About this Discussion
427 Replies
12 Participants
HarrisonG
EnclaveForum.net: Buick Enclave Online Community
We’re a forum community dedicated to Buick Enclave SUV owners & enthusiasts. Come join the discussion about upgrades, towing capacity, reliability, and more!
Full Forum Listing
Top