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Okay guys, is this a reasonable solution to a leaky tire situation...? My right front tire has been slowly losing pressure since I got my vehicle. Just a little, couple of pounds at a time. Nothing I would even notice, except for the tire pressure monitor. Well, today I had her in to have the side moldings/wind deflector installed and again the tire pressure was down 2 pounds, so I asked them to check it. They found nothing wrong with the tire but suggested I let them put nitrogen in them, in place of air because it does not fluctuate like air does. At a cost to me of $40. After thinking about it, I asked why I had to pay for this since the tire should be covered. They told me that first we had to find out what the problem was...this was the first step. I asked if I would get my $40 back--No--I know this isn't much money (and we did finally agree to each pay 1/2, $20 each), and I am probably not understanding this problem, totally...I still think GM should be taking responsiblity for the complete cost here. Now people, can you explain to me why they are not? Or just help me to understand this situation? Is anyone else here having a problem keeping the pressure up in their tire(s)? You guys are da best! (That includes you, too, Axiama--chuckle, chuckle) [/color] :eyebrow:
 

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For me it has been the RR tire, now the LF since I had them rotated. I loose about 1 pound every week. Nothing could be found wrong with it. I tested the DIC against a good digital tire guage and they matched.
 

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Rosita2001 said:
Okay guys, is this a reasonable solution to a leaky tire situation...? My right front tire has been slowly losing pressure since I got my vehicle. Just a little, couple of pounds at a time. Nothing I would even notice, except for the tire pressure monitor. Well, today I had her in to have the side moldings/wind deflector installed and again the tire pressure was down 2 pounds, so I asked them to check it. They found nothing wrong with the tire but suggested I let them put nitrogen in them, in place of air because it does not fluctuate like air does. At a cost to me of $40. After thinking about it, I asked why I had to pay for this since the tire should be covered. They told me that first we had to find out what the problem was...this was the first step. I asked if I would get my $40 back--No--I know this isn't much money (and we did finally agree to each pay 1/2, $20 each), and I am probably not understanding this problem, totally...I still think GM should be taking responsiblity for the complete cost here. Now people, can you explain to me why they are not? Or just help me to understand this situation? Is anyone else here having a problem keeping the pressure up in their tire(s)? You guys are da best! (That includes you, too, Axiama--chuckle, chuckle) [/color] :eyebrow:
Rosita, I have never heard of adding nitrogen, but I am sure others have. I am with you though, I don't think you should have had to pay for it unless they found a nail or something in it. If this has been happening since you got it, there is a problem and I would ask for a new tire period. Be tough, don't let them take advantage of your kind nature. You don't pay this much for a car to have a leaking tire period.....Give me the number and I will call them for you if I have to.
 

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I’m having the same problem with my left rear tire. It has a slow leak that needs air added to it about once a month. It’s currently showing 28 psi so it’s time to refill it again. There was a discussion about switching from air to nitrogen a few months ago. Some people thought it was a great idea others thought it was a waste of money. Here’s the link if you want to look into it further.

http://www.enclaveforum.net/index.php?topic=210.0
 

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axiama adding a lb or 2, of air, once a month is quite normal, especially in winter months. Almost all non-steel rims have some rim leak seepage, and considering the pounding these big tires take, 1-2 lbs monthly is normal. More than that or more frequent loss can be something else. A very simple water tank test, at high pressure should resolve it. Period. Also remember: Never put Fix-a-Flat in a vehicle with Tire Pressure monitor system, like Enclave has, unless desperate to get moving!! It will ruin the sensor.

Nitrogen tire pressuring has been the norm in race cars for years. The chemical differences (less retaining of moisture) and molecule size difference yields less leakage and less pressure variance with temperature changes. I'd try it and see if it helps with a suspected rim leak. It's mostly unnecessary in majority of autos. But as bsox says, why are you paying for it??? Barring a nail or cut, our tire/new car warranty covers it!
 

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Smokin may certainly be correct that losing air is normal as he is more knowledgable than I, but I can say I never have had to add air to any tire I have ever had on a consistent basis like this. I think it means there is something wrong with that tire, why for example would you not have to add air to the other three if losing a couple of pounds of air a month is normal? My Montero had 80,000 miles on Michelins, and I don't believe I ever added air one time. On the contrary, my Pilot had one tire that was losing air needed a little every couple of weeks until I had it checked out and they removed a nail from it!!!!!
 

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Hi bsox. Your questions are valid. However, It IS COMMON for one alloy type rim to not seat it's tire perfectly, and need a LITTLE air once a month. But as you say, more than this is abnormal and SHOULD BE DOUBLE-CHECKED. I didn't see a time-frame in Rosita2001 post? Weeks, months, miles? axiama mentions once a month and I assume it's 7-10 lbs low, if she's then at 28Lbs. That's TOO much!

Are we all being consistent and checking air when always COLD tire or always HOT tire (less than 1 mile running)?? Make 3-5 lbs. reading diff in Winter!! Just a FYI.......


As for your Montero experience, I'm mystified how you got away with NEVER adding air for 80,00 miles. I can only guess that you're service guys checked/filled the air, at oil changes etc., over the years?? Suffice to say, perhaps this was a unique experience, in my years of auto ramblings, anyway. But all things are possible with automobiles :thumb:

Getting back to Enclave with alloy wheels (rims) I have checked my DIC and added air every 2-3000 miles so far, About 2-3 lbs per tire. Equally. This is norm, in my 35 years of auto enthusiasm/experience, at least with low profile, alloy rims, in Winter months. But 2-5 lbs a week will harm the tire as you're running low too often, too long, to get proper handling/treadwear. She can try the Nitro or demand they replace rim. My 2 cents ;D
 

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As I said you are much more knowledgable than I am and you proved it with your last post, but truly I never added air, but they certainly might (probably were) have been doing it at oil changes as you suggested.
 

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bsox said:
As I said you are much more knowledgable than I am and you proved it with your last post, but truly I never added air, but they certainly might (probably were) have been doing it at oil changes as you suggested.
I believe you! But "much more knowledgeable" ?? Just more mileage me thinks! ;)
 

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Smokin SRX said:
axiama adding a lb or 2, of air, once a month is quite normal, especially in winter months. Almost all non-steel rims have some rim leak seepage, and considering the pounding these big tires take, 1-2 lbs monthly is normal. More than that or more frequent loss can be something else. A very simple water tank test, at high pressure should resolve it. Period. Also remember: Never put Fix-a-Flat in a vehicle with Tire Pressure monitor system, like Enclave has, unless desperate to get moving!! It will ruin the sensor.
I'll have to pay better attention to this to see if I need to have the tire checked. I'm guessing it's been about a month since Mr. Axiama added air to the tires. But that's just a guess - it could have been 4 months ago. I'll start watching it now. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It's only been three times in about three months...5000 miles, today. So, a couple pounds a month. I can agree that tires sometimes lose air. But only one tire out of the 4 and the same one every time? I understand the tire pressure monitoring system can add confusion to the whole thing. The main objection I had was paying for the nitrogen. Since I only had to pay half, I guess I won't worry about it. If I keep having trouble with it I will take it to a "real" tire store and get to the bottom of the problem. [/color] :angryfire:
 

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Rosita2001 said:
It's only been three times in about three months...5000 miles, today. So, a couple pounds a month. I can agree that tires sometimes lose air. But only one tire out of the 4 and the same one every time? I understand the tire pressure monitoring system can add confusion to the whole thing. The main objection I had was paying for the nitrogen. Since I only had to pay half, I guess I won't worry about it. If I keep having trouble with it I will take it to a "real" tire store and get to the bottom of the problem. [/color] :angryfire:
Way to go, Rosita2001 . Yeah, it's not abnormally high loss, but if only 1 out of 4 is doing it, it's not you're driving style/speeds. You have a nail/valve or rim leak. Common to have rim leaks with alloy wheels. they can un-mount, clean rim and put back. The pure Nitrogen may solve it, as the Molecule itself is larger than air molecules, which is about 75% nitrogen anyway! As long as they split the cost, what the heck? And you can mix nitro and air at any time!

Pls let us know outcome :thumb:
 

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Rosita2001 said:
It's only been three times in about three months...5000 miles, today. So, a couple pounds a month. I can agree that tires sometimes lose air. But only one tire out of the 4 and the same one every time? I understand the tire pressure monitoring system can add confusion to the whole thing. The main objection I had was paying for the nitrogen. Since I only had to pay half, I guess I won't worry about it. If I keep having trouble with it I will take it to a "real" tire store and get to the bottom of the problem. [/color] :angryfire:
Rosita2001, $20 for nitrogen in 4 tires is a really good deal as everyone I've ever dealt with charges at least $10 per tire. Its supposed to be better for the tires. I don't know if thats true or if it helps with winter rim leaks but its certainly worth the try. As several people have pointed out, loosing air slowly in the winter is usually the result of a small leak between the tire & the rim. I've experienced that in many vehicles over the years but not my Enclave as yet.
 

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OK. I don't get it. What is the REAL value in nitrogen gas in one's tires? I know it supposed to be "better", and it is used in racing tires (considering the stress on racing tires, that makes sense). But in reality, for passenger tires, regular air is 80% nitrogen anyway. I know it also supposed to drier. But when you have to refill your tires, which you will at some point, don't you defeat the original nitrogen inflation? What about the residual air in the tire at the time of the original mounting?
I would propose that it is a machine that tire shops buy that they plug in and "money" comes out the hose! I know that there are those that will argue the point (especially tire dealers that have the machine!), but what is the REAL value for regular consumers like us? ???

I found this elsewhere and thought that it seems like a reasonable approach (and has the same impression I have to boot!)

Ingersoll Rand claims that there are several distinct advantages to filling your tires with Nitrogen:

Better air pressure retention -- Nitrogen doesn't seep out through the tire walls like Oxygen can, so tires remain fully inflated longer.
Enhanced fuel economy -- Nitrogen dissipates heat faster than air, and heat causes rolling resistance. "Maintaining tire pressure can boost fuel economy by as much as 6 percent."
Longer tread life -- Filling your tires with pure Nitrogen makes tires run cooler, which will reduce tire failure. It also prevents oxidation, which can cause tread separation and belt failure. Since Nitrogen doesn't carry moisture, it won't cause rust on the inside of rims and valve stems.
Slow chemical aging -- "Filling a tire with Nitrogen also significantly slows the chemical aging process of the tire's rubber components."
It costs between $3 and $10 per tire to get your SUV running on a cushion of Nitrogen. Is it worth it?
There's significant debate about the value of filling your tires with Nitrogen. On Eng-Tips Forums, a web board for engineering professionals, the "Nitrogen filled tires?" thread is full of passionate discussion, most of it quite skeptical about the practical benefits of the practice. The consensus opinion on Eng-Tips Forums seems to be that the benefits of Nitrogen are largely academic -- tires are engineered to be filled with ambient air, wheels are designed to cope with the moisture that air carries, and the benefits of Nitrogen, in real world applications, though real, are not worth the cost.

My bottom line advice: Save your money, and keep your tires properly inflated with air. You'll get much better results investing in a small compressor for your garage and keeping your SUV tires properly inflated with air. If your local tire shop has a Nitrogen Tire Inflation System, see if you can get them to include a free fill-up with Nitrogen when you buy your next new set of tires, and try it on for size. Do some real-world tests and join the debate.
 

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xrayman has it right! It's mostly hype in my opinion too, but in some cases, may help with specific problems such as Rosita2001 may have. Other than that, $$$ machine for shops, as you say. Around here, if you pay the $59 for all 4 to be emptied and refilled, TOP-OFFS are free!

For the vast majority of us, the benes don't outweigh the costs, IMO also :thumb:
 

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I have some thoughts:

2MuchCoffee said:
Always keep tires on the same side of the car. Especially important with directional tires. Tires are broken in rotating in one direction. The belts get use to going that way. If you swap tires diagonally you rotate them in the other direction and they have to bed in differently. Bad plan. The tire may not like the re-setting of its directional rotation and could have a belt failure or blow out.

From what I have read, this way of thinking may be changing. Some radial tire makers are saying that a crossing pattern is OK. Directional tires however must ALWAYS be on the same side of the car.

About inflation: I set the tires Hot. Meaning after I have been driving as I normally would I set the tire pressure. You want to do this right after you park. Do not linger before doing pressures.

This seems at odds to everything that I have read. The recommended pressures are for "cold" tires. It is expected that they will be higher at running temp. But that temp will be variable depending on loads, ambient temp., etc. I believe that tire manufacturers take this into account, It should not however exceed the max pressure molded on the side wall.

I set mine between 36 and 38 PSI. You can later measure the pressure cold to see what that pressure would be. Don’t let one side of the car sit in sun light and the other in shade. The tires will have a different pressure cold. Measure in the morning before the sun gets to the car or in the garage. Each time you check the pressure you let air out.

Agree

If you check when cold, expect to be about 2 PSI lower (34 - 36). Even tread wear is the best indicator that you have been running with the right inflation.

Agree, rec pressure is 35 PSI when cold.

When first out for any day, I check "cold" and get 34 all around. If off (usually lower), I then read upon return and look for higher, since "hot." If not up to level desired, I'm off to the pump and use my digital gauge and push up to 38 (still hot). I might bleed down to 36, but usually wait until cold to back down to 34.

Just keep in mind that the best indicator that you've got it right is to keep a good handle on your tread wear.
;D

Agree whole heartedly. Some of the issues I point out above may be more of a matter of differing opinions with no one "right" answer. :thumb:
 

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I didn't read all of the responses hear in detail but I know I had a leak in one of my Outback tires and the needle in the valve stem was a little loose. I tightened it up with the appropriate tool and no more leaks.
 

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zman said:
I didn't read all of the responses hear in detail but I know I had a leak in one of my Outback tires and the needle in the valve stem was a little loose. I tightened it up with the appropriate tool and no more leaks.

Hey zman ,we forgot that little detail!! Some tire caps have a 2 prong tightener right on top of them! Any auto store sells, or any tire shop would give you a "twist" for free, I'm sure.

You can put a little water and soap/dishwashing detergent onto the valve tip (take cap off first ;) ) and any leakage will immediately "bubble". Fast check! Thx for remembering this often overlooked tip!!
 

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I've never really looked at the Enclave stem caps to see if they have the feature built in but I think the tool cost me a whole $5 at the auto parts store, and that included a handful of the valve needles.
 
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