EnclaveForum.net: Buick Enclave Online Community banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yesterday morning my car wouldn't start up at all, when I turn the key all the lights on the dash worked all the lights in the vehicle work but it just would not start the engine. It made no ticking sound or any sound at all when i tried to start it. Now when I went outside to check on it (which is the next day) it started right up like nothing happened.
Is it the starter? Is a corrosion?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
321 Posts
If it’s a mechanical shifter, I have unstuck a neutral safety switch just by moving it through the gears a few times. If it is electronic I’m not sure if the switch is mechanical or electronic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
I'm having a similar issue I was just about to post about. I have a 2010 Enclave. I've started noticing it was turning over longer than usual and not cranking immediately. It sounded like it was dragging a little so I had it check out. The dealer told me I had a bad battery and replaced it. Once I got the car back, it still seemed like it was turning over long than it should.

Well this past week, my wife said the car wouldn't start at all. She finally got it to start and got it home. I've been messing with it the last few nights. A few times it will turn over and crank. Then sometimes it won't turn over at all. I will hear a single click, the dash lights go out for a second like it's starting up and the gauges do their little reset/test. I tried turning the key again and still nothing. I'd wait a few minutes, then it cranks again. So I thought it might be the starter.

Next day I tried the same thing, but it almost seemed like I could get it to act up if I turned the ignition really quick/hard. If I gave it a slower turn, it would turnover and crank. Maybe it was coincidence. I then started thinking it might be ignition. I tried it one final time tonight and while it was dragging on start up, it would start eventually.

What does this sound like? Starter? Ignition? How much do each of those typically cost to replace? I'm trying to hang onto this car one more year, but I'm really getting tired of sinking money into it.

Can anyone provide tips or suggestions?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
671 Posts
A slow crank is either low voltage at the starter or a bad starter. It wouldn't have anything to do with the ignition switch because all that switch is doing is sending a low amperage signal down a thin gauge wire to a relay that controls the high amperage current that goes down the large gauge wire to your starter. The signal from the ignition either gets there or it doesn't, it's not like a weak output there could cause the slow crank.

Battery troubleshooting 101.
Start by removing both terminals and cleaning the terminals and the posts. Don't just look at them and say "they look clean". Actually take them off, clean them with one of those little battery post cleaning tools, and put them back on good and tight.
Next up, a voltage test. Sitting with no load and nothing running it should be 12.6 to 12.8. Anything less and it's under charged and you need to start looking at the charging system or the battery itself.
After that, another voltage test, but with the car running. Should be around 13.7 to 14.7. Anything higher or lower and you've got charging system issues.
Voltages good? Have it load tested. A weak battery can show 12.6 volts but still not have anywhere near the load capacity to reliably start your car. You won't likely have a load tester so stop by Autozone/Advance Auto for a free test.

If all that checks out and you still have random slow cranking/no cranking etc, now you can dive into the more complicated stuff. We talk about grounds a lot, they're a common issue. Look for heavy gauge wires going from the engine to the frame or the main terminal block. Start by following the negative cable on the battery. I've never had a ground issue on my Enclave so I've never looked to see where the various grounds are so maybe someone else can point them out. A weak ground can definitely cause a slow crank because the starter is the highest amperage load in your car. You'll also want to check the connections at the starter itself. A loose or badly corroded connection here can cause the starter not to get enough amperage.

When all of that checks out now it's looking likely you have a bad starter. You can remove it and have it tested, but personally before I get to the point where I'm pulling a starter I've carefully checked all the other things it could be so that I'm confident the starter is bad. Even if it tests ok on the bench at that point I'm not going through all the work to reinstall it and risk that it's only occasionally "good". A new one goes in at this point. With the tight engine compartments of modern vehicles there is almost always some stuff in the way of removing the starter so it's usually not a quick job to swap one even though they're usually held on with just a couple bolts and a couple wires to disconnect.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top