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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My December OnStar Vehicle Diagnostic email reported that I need to think about rotating the tires. Has anyone taken their vehicle in to the dealer to do this? I am wondering what the approximate charge for the rotation and the seemingly involved 'TPMS Sensor Matching Process' is.

Wayne
 

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I contacted my dealer and they wanted $21 to rotate the tires. They said nothning about an additional charge for the TPMS Sensor Mathcing Process. I looked in manual and found nothing telling me what needed to be done if I rotated the tires myself.
 

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Yeah, I DO rotate my tires at about 10,000 miles. I just go front to rear..........no crossing sides, cause I'm old school!

Now, of course the tire sensors will be confused! They point to a specific location from the 4. Dealer has to change program. (doubt it's free?) I've already decided to LEAVE them be, and be happy just knowing that ONE of the tires on my LEFT (or Right) side is Low. I can take it from there :thumb:

If anyone else has idea, please post.

PS.........some "lower-end" or older autos just have a lite that just says "Tire pressure Low" , no specifics. You're on your own from there. Still much better than nothing and avoids this whole discussion! :confused: ;D Progress!?
 

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Smokin SRX said:
Yeah, I DO rotate my tires at about 10,000 miles. I just go front to rear..........no crossing sides, cause I'm old school!
Uh, tire rotation used to be to cross over and use the spare. How "old school" are you??

I, however, was born at a very young age! :binky:

TM
 

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I'm just a "old head" on a young man's body! You must have a few miles on the odemeter yourself ;) Let's call it "wisdom" :thumb:

But seriously, I believe it was in the early days of radials C. 1975 ?) that you couldn't switch sides of car, as directional spin reverses then, and the tires radial bands would weaken. Even today, my recently departed Caddy SRX Northstar V-8 had 18" tires which were UNI-DIRECTIONAL radials! The Corvette has had a long time. I suspect same issue applies to them.

So, I'm sticking ! ;) ;D
 

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I'd have to go look in the manual again, but I believe you move the backs to the fronts (same side) then the fronts to the back (opposite sides). You do cross them. Are the tire pressure transmitters in the valve stems?
 

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Smokin SRX said:
Now, of course the tire sensors will be confused! They point to a specific location from the 4. Dealer has to change program. (doubt it's free?) I've already decided to LEAVE them be, and be happy just knowing that ONE of the tires on my LEFT (or Right) side is Low. I can take it from there :thumb:

If anyone else has idea, please post.
You can have the vehicle re-learn the new sensor locations yourself. I can't find the post right now but someone posted the instructions either here or on the Acadia forum. It deals with adding or removing pressure from each tire during a certain sequence.

EDIT: Found it on the Acadia forum:

I wish it was as easy as pressing the relearn button, but it is a twelve step process that you have to complete in 5 minutes. pg 446 - 447 in manual and requires you to let air out of each tire in order - see below.

You have two minutes to match the first tire/wheel position, and five minutes overall to match all four tire/wheel positions. If it takes longer than two minutes to match the first tire and wheel, or more than five minutes to match all our tire and wheel positions, the matching process stops and you will need to start over.

The TPMS sensor matching process is outlined
below:
1. Set the parking brake.

2. Turn the ignition switch to ON with the
engine off.

3. Using the DIC, press the vehicle information
button until the PRESSV TO RELEARN TIRE
POSITIONS message displays. If your vehicle
does not have the DIC buttons, press the trip
odometer reset stem located on the instrument
panel cluster until the RELEARN TIRE
POSITIONS message displays.

4. If your vehicle has the DIC buttons, press the
set/reset button. The horn sounds twice to
indicate the TPMS receiver is ready, and the
TIRE LEARNING ACTIVE message
displays. If your vehicle does not have the
DIC buttons, press and hold the trip odometer
reset stem until the horn chirps twice and
the TIRE LEARNING ACTIVE message
is displayed.

5. Start with the driver side front tire. The driver
side front turn signal lamp is on.

6. Remove the valve cap from the valve stem.
Activate the TPMS sensor by increasing
or decreasing the tire’s air pressure for
five seconds, or until a horn chirp sounds.
The horn chirp, which may take up to
30 seconds to sound, confirms that the sensor
identification code has been matched to this
tire and wheel position.

7. Proceed to the passenger side front tire.
The passenger side front turn signal lamp is on.
Repeat the procedure in Step 6.

8. Proceed to the passenger side rear tire.
The passenger side rear turn signal lamp is on.
Repeat the procedure in Step 6.

9. Proceed to the driver side rear tire. The driver
side rear turn signal lamp is on. Repeat the
procedure in Step 6. Instead of a single horn
chirp a double horn chirp signals the TPMS
sensor has been matched to this tire and wheel
position and the matching process is no longer
active.

10. Turn the ignition switch to OFF.

11. Set all four tires to the recommended air
pressure level as indicated on the Tire and
Loading Information label.

12. Put the valve caps back on the valve stems.
 

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JRacer said:
I'd have to go look in the manual again, but I believe you move the backs to the fronts (same side) then the fronts to the back (opposite sides). You do cross them. Are the tire pressure transmitters in the valve stems?
Without looking it up, I believe you are correct about switching the sides of car, and YES, tire valve stems house the Sensor ID Points for air pressure, thus the anticipated confusion of OE reco rotation method.

If anyone knows a quick DIY cure to this, please inform ;D

PS......for same Sensor-in-valve reason, NEVER use a can of FIX-A-Flat on this sled!! Sensor will self-destuct!
 

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zman thx for the data! Maybe when I retire I'll have time to go through all that each time I rotate ;)

For now, front to back and again, same side of car rotation, at every other oil changes will accomplish mission and keep me happy! ;D
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I just called my local dealer for info. He said a rotation was $19.95 and included the TPMS sensor match. Doesn't sound too bad. Probably will have them do it at the next oil change.
Thanks for the help. :thumb:

Wayne
 

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sunshadw said:
I just called my local dealer for info. He said a rotation was $19.95 and included the TPMS sensor match. Doesn't sound too bad. Probably will have them do it at the next oil change.
Thanks for the help. :thumb:

Wayne
Here in NY suburbs we pay $30 for a tire rotation plus a dollar a pound for air! ;) ;D

Can I stop by you and use your dealer??
 

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Now that I have the second set of wheels from Rick I hope that winter tires are available next year. Does anyone know if having the vehicle learn new sensors is the same process as if the existing wheels were simply rotated? I am trying to figure out how much of a hassle the TMPS is going to be with a second set of OEM wheels.

Thanks.
 

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I have a Service Agreement and the Dealer rotates my tires free of charge. I don't know what they do about the sensors , but they are already "calibrated" when I get the Enclave back.
 

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zman said:
Now that I have the second set of wheels from Rick I hope that winter tires are available next year. Does anyone know if having the vehicle learn new sensors is the same process as if the existing wheels were simply rotated? I am trying to figure out how much of a hassle the TMPS is going to be with a second set of OEM wheels.

Thanks.
It's the same process. The dealer techs do it with their Tech II computer after they're rotated-it has built-in wireless so they don't have to do anything in the car. Pretty slick. You can do it yourself using the process above. It's also outlined in the owners manual.
 

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Tralfaz said:
It's the same process. The dealer techs do it with their Tech II computer after they're rotated-it has built-in wireless so they don't have to do anything in the car. Pretty slick. You can do it yourself using the process above. It's also outlined in the owners manual.
For the price, I let the dealer do it when I have the oil changed every 7,500 miles. The oil life indicator tells me to change oil at about 10,000 miles, but I think that is too long for both oil change & tire rotation.
With no full size spare, :mad: I use the "forward cross rotation"; cross the rears to the front, and the fronts straight back on the same side. This way each wheel gets to every position.
 

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newtobuick said:
For the price, I let the dealer do it when I have the oil changed every 7,500 miles. The oil life indicator tells me to change oil at about 10,000 miles, but I think that is too long for both oil change & tire rotation.
With no full size spare, :mad: I use the "forward cross rotation"; cross the rears to the front, and the fronts straight back on the same side. This way each wheel gets to every position.
About tires... Here are some thoughts I hope are helpful... You want to inspect the tires at approximately monthly intervals to check tire wear. If the center is showing signs of more wear than the edges, drop the pressure 2 PSI.
Note that pressures can be different for this to happen front vs. rear. The fronts might be wearing just fine at 34 PSI while the rears might be running out the centers at 34 PSI. You have to check.

I usually rotate tires spring and fall. The 7,500-mile rule worth pretty well for us since we have a 15,000/yearly lease, Basically this is at the equinox. If you run summer and winter tires just put the front tires on the rear when they are re-installed.

Note: Always keep tires on the same side of the car. Especially important with directional tires. Tires are broken in rotating in one direction. The belts get use to going that way. If you swap tires diagonally you rotate them in the other direction and they have to bed in differently. Bad plan. The tire may not like the re-setting of its directional rotation and could have a belt failure or blow out. Michelin Latitudes we have say that the belt-setting is not an issue, but I play it safe and "rotate" just fore and aft, not across.

With your tire monitor system you can see what the tire pressures are hot and cold. You will notice that the cold and hot temps vary summer to winter. You just have to keep track. Wear does not vary except with pressure so when you determine the hot pressure where the tires are wearing evenly try to keep them in that range. Factory pressures are typically set for comfort so are a little on the soft side. You could set the pressures at the cold factory setting and see what that translates to a hot pressure. Then add 4 PSI. You should notice a difference in the steering and ride.
Factory pressures being a little low will wear the edges of the tire before the center. Slightly higher pressures improve tire performance because the tire flexes (squirms) less under braking and turning

There can sometimes be a tradeoff between comfort, handling and wear. I prefer safety to comfort so my compromises are for handling and wear. Keep in mind that a tire that is showing even wear across the tread has the most tire on the ground vs a tire that is running out the center or running off the edges.

That, friends, is everything I know about tires. ;D
 

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Another alternative is to just live with them in the rotated position. The system will still tell me if a tire is significantly under and I don't have a problem figuring out which one it is if it occurs. They'll be in the right positions the next time I rotate them......
 

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Smokin SRX said:
I'm just a "old head" on a young man's body! You must have a few miles on the odemeter yourself ;) Let's call it "wisdom" :thumb:

But seriously, I believe it was in the early days of radials C. 1975 ?) that you couldn't switch sides of car, as directional spin reverses then, and the tires radial bands would weaken. Even today, my recently departed Caddy SRX Northstar V-8 had 18" tires which were UNI-DIRECTIONAL radials! The Corvette has had a long time. I suspect same issue applies to them.

So, I'm sticking ! ;) ;D
IMO if the tire is marked unidirectional then it can only go front to back or vice versa, if it is not marked such then it can also go side to side as well.
 

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24fan24-7 said:
Just did this yesterday and it was much easier than I thought.
Thanks
I hate to sound cheap, but my dealer wants $59-69 for a full tire rotate and re-program, alone. My local trusted shop does it in 1/2 hr, W/O the reprogramming (I can do that if I wanted, but don't ) and keeps rights on the right and lefts on left. He has the special colored torque drive wrenches and does a synthetic oil change at same time for about $85 total. If I did the oil/rotate myself, it would be about $35 for the parts and I'd kill 3 hrs. I won't do it anymore. Plus nothing beats a view underneath the auto, if only for kicks ;D

Every 7-10k miles, I'll do both. That's about once a year for me. He'll even do the Inspection next time. I don't care if it's a month early. All in one stop is nice :thumb: However , if I go to the dealer for a warranty service, I will "throw them a bone". That's how my last tire rotate got done. Hey ya gotta be fair?

PS.....If you wait a long interval as I will do, be sure and look over your tires pressure (don't wait for the sensor to tell you you're low! You'll eat up the treads!!) and lift the hood at least once a month, for a fluid/general look over. Use a flashlite. Check the belts, hoses, filler caps (often missing!! :confused: ) and spills, corrosions etc.

You'll be safer and less surprises :thumb:
 
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